Marshall's Theory: Wading Through the President's Holographic Nightmares / by Caleb Sawyer

With the current political climate as it is, it only makes sense that it impacts as many levels of media as possible. Benjamin Poynter's (@BenjaminPoynter) Marshall's Theory, puts players in control of the President of the United States during one of his nightmares. A strange mix of hilarity and morbidity, "Marshall's Theory [is] a game with a central theme of paranoia."

Players control POTUS as he attempts to fight back protesters, encircling him with arms raised and signs hoisted. You can fire tweets to mow them down, carpet bomb them, or call in an Area-of-Effect strike a la Vladimir Putin dive-bombing the ground, Russian flag cape and all.

Marshall's theory utilizes a type of holographic projection provided by the minds at Looking Glass (@LKGGlass). The HoloPlayer One is an interesting piece of tech, and with a game like Marshall's Theory, the unsettling setting is complimented by the fuzzy holographic display.

Developer Benjamin Poynter, when asked about the role of games with social stances, thinks that games could say more. His experience travelling through D.C. with his wife during the Travel Ban protests, inspired him to take a stance and make games that voiced that stance. Marshall's Theory being the first.

Putin flies in to do damage.

Putin flies in to do damage.

Marshall's Theory definitely uses that voice without pulling punches. As players survive the nightmare and the protesters all drop dead, a prompt follows that says, brought to you by "The American Health Care Act." This is followed shortly after by an image of Abraham Lincoln falling on a spike. "It is a message that illustrates the death of Democracy," Poynter says. It certainly gets that point across.

Marshall's theory is also playable on PC. 

~Caleb
@LubWub